Tropical Vegetation Described by Mark Twain

Tropical Vegetation Described by Mark Twain is adapted from his book Following the Equator [1897]:

BAMBOO PLANTS

What a soaring, strenuous, gushing fountain spray of delicate greenery a bunch of bamboo is! As far as the eye can reach, these grand vegetable geysers grace the view.

BANANA PLANTS

And there are fields of bananas, with the sunshine glancing from the varnished surface of their drooping vast leaves.

PALM TREES

And there are frequent groves of palm; and an effective accent is given to the landscape by isolated individuals of this picturesque family, towering, clean-stemmed, their plumes broken and hanging ragged, Nature's imitation of an umbrella that has been out to see what a cyclone is like and is trying not to look disappointed.

BANYAN TREE

We saw a banyan tree which sent down supporting stems from branches which were sixty feet above the ground, that spider-legged thing with its wilderness of vegetable columns.

RAIN FOREST

You have a ragged luxuriance of tropic vegetation of vivid greens of varying shades, a wild tangle of underbrush, with graceful tall palms lifting their crippled plumes high above it; and you have stretches of shady dense forest with limpid streams frolicking through them.

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